Tomato jalapeno ragout

by | Jan 29, 2024 | 0 comments

Maria Die Stimme

Roasted potatoes with colourful vegetables and soy dip

Colourful variety on the plate. A rich meal for all the senses. A cheat sheet for food intolerances.

Apple celery soup with roasted fennel

This soup contains all the Ayurvedic flavours: sweet, sour, salty, hot, bitter and tart. Do you know which of the ingredients belongs to which flavour? Try it out and enjoy this harmonious soup.

Baked pumpkin with date fig sauce

Savour the sweetness of life. Get in the mood for the end of the year with this pumpkin dish. Enjoy the peace and quiet, go into retreat and introspection. Connect with Mother Earth. This meal nourishes your lower 3 flames and gives you a sense of security.

Chapati

Chapati are an ideal accompaniment to an Ayurvedic meal or in the evening with a warming soup to reduce VATA.

rocket herb pasta

If you're in a hurry, this simple but very tasty recipe is ideal. If you have rocket and herbs growing in your own garden - bring them on!

Lemongrass soup with prawns

Wanderlust? This soup brings the warmth, aromas and flavours of Thailand to your table. It also combines the Ayurvedic principles of the 6 flavours, warming your body and soul.

Maria Die Stimme

Here you will find an overview of all recipes

kitchen sound

Find more information about Ayurveda, plant knowledge and healing cuisine in the "Kitchen sounds" section.

For me, sweet and sour tomatoes epitomise the summer of my childhood. We always had an abundance of home-grown tomatoes. The whole garden smelled of the incomparable aroma of the tomato plant.

How did this recipe come about?

I love tomatoes because they bring back so many wonderful memories and the sweet and sour flavour flatters my VATA constitution. As I only eat tomatoes in season and from my own garden, I can hardly wait until my home-grown red favourites are ripe. In my overzealousness, I once again grew too many plants and the yield was so plentiful that I came up with a tomato sauce for lunch. I found some ripe jalapenos and peppers next to my tomato plants and the new dish was born in my head. I immediately set about making it in my cookery studio.

What does this sauce go with?

This sauce is very versatile. In larger quantities, it can be served with pasta, nettle dumplings or rice, and is also flavourful with fish and meat. In small quantities and slightly thickened, it is also suitable as a dip for barbecues, fondue or raclette.

Garlic substitute Asafoetida!

I'm a little sensitive to the use of garlic, but I really like the flavour, especially in a tomato dish. Asafoetida is therefore an excellent substitute for garlic. Asafoetida is the gum resin from the root of the ferula plant. In Indian cuisine, asafoetida is also known as hing. Asafoetida is dried and usually ground with fenugreek as a carrier substance for use in the kitchen. The spice has a strong, pungent, slightly sulphurous odour and is therefore similar to the taste and smell of garlic. Asafoetida helps with digestion, has a deflating effect and makes tomatoes more digestible. Use asafoetida very carefully, as the fenugreek in the spice powder is very bitter and the dish can quickly become too bitter as a result (my own "bitter" experience!).

Ayurveda, tomatoes and the seasons

To maintain health and balance, it is advisable to eat seasonally. Tomatoes in winter are not good for our health and should be avoided outside the summer season. The tomato is a nightshade plant and should not be consumed in excess according to Ayurvedic principles. Tomatoes contain a lot of histamine and can lead to intolerances if eaten in excess. When I started to study Ayurveda, the principles and the composition and effects of food, I suddenly realised a lot of things. I had been eating very carelessly. It was like an eye-opener and I realised why my health wasn't really good. Tomatoes are a good example. I didn't realise how often I cooked something with tomatoes. Pasta with tomato sauce, tomato puree in soup etc. When I started to reduce my tomato consumption, I felt better very quickly. Now, when I enjoy tomatoes in summer, I have no problems.

I mainly eat seasonally, i.e. I don't buy blueberries, strawberries etc. in winter and am all the happier when the time comes to either pick these little fruits myself in the garden, receive them as gifts from dear neighbours or pick them up at the weekly market. The philosophy of Ayurveda also includes respecting and appreciating food and making a conscious choice. Nature gives us what we need most at the time of year.

Note on the recipe
Black salt is a special Ayurvedic rock salt that is fermented with fruit and has a slightly sulphurous flavour. It goes very well with tomatoes. Feel free to experiment with the spices again. I really like the flavour of cloves, which also have an antibacterial and antiviral effect. It's a great way to beat the summer flu. Cloves harmonise very well with tomatoes. If you want something a little more Italian, add a sprig of rosemary, thyme and oregano. There are no limits to your creativity. Listen to your inner voice.

Persons

4

Time

30 min

Cuisine

Ayurveda

Course

Supplement

Ingredients

500 g tomatoes
2 cloves of garlic
1 Jalapeno
1 small green pepper
1 red onion
2 cloves
1 tsp mustard seeds
1 tbsp olive oil
Black salt and rock salt to flavour

Preparation steps

Step 1

Wash and quarter the tomatoes.

Step 2

Peel and finely slice the garlic cloves.

Step 3

Wash and cut the jalapeno and pepper into cubes.

Step 4

Peel the red onion and cut into small cubes.

Step 5

Heat the olive oil in a pan, briefly fry the mustard seeds and cloves until fragrant, then immediately add the red onion and garlic clove and fry until translucent.

Step 6

Add the peppers and jalapeno to the onion and garlic mixture and sauté for 2 minutes.

Step 7

Then deglaze the mixture with the tomatoes and simmer gently for about 15 minutes.

Step 8

Flavour with black salt and rock salt.

Roasted potatoes with colourful vegetables and soy dip

Colourful variety on the plate. A rich meal for all the senses. A cheat sheet for food intolerances.

Apple celery soup with roasted fennel

This soup contains all the Ayurvedic flavours: sweet, sour, salty, hot, bitter and tart. Do you know which of the ingredients belongs to which flavour? Try it out and enjoy this harmonious soup.

Baked pumpkin with date fig sauce

Savour the sweetness of life. Get in the mood for the end of the year with this pumpkin dish. Enjoy the peace and quiet, go into retreat and introspection. Connect with Mother Earth. This meal nourishes your lower 3 flames and gives you a sense of security.

Chapati

Chapati are an ideal accompaniment to an Ayurvedic meal or in the evening with a warming soup to reduce VATA.

rocket herb pasta

If you're in a hurry, this simple but very tasty recipe is ideal. If you have rocket and herbs growing in your own garden - bring them on!

Lemongrass soup with prawns

Wanderlust? This soup brings the warmth, aromas and flavours of Thailand to your table. It also combines the Ayurvedic principles of the 6 flavours, warming your body and soul.

Here you will find an overview of all articles

Shamanic sound

You can find everything about shamanism, ancient knowledge and my tools as a shaman in the “Shaman Sound” section.

contact

2 + 14 =

Data protection

I agree that my details and data will be collected and stored electronically to answer my enquiry. Note: Cancellation by e-mail to maria.aunkofer@maria-die-stimme.com

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *