Baked pumpkin with date fig sauce

by | Jan 23, 2024 | 0 comments

Maria Die Stimme

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Maria Die Stimme

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This dish is a wonderful way to get in the mood for the cold season. It connects you to the lower cauldron - your three energy centres. It is about savouring the sweetness of life, retreating into the belly of Mother Earth, cultivating introspection and connecting with All That Is. Colours are also very important when eating, as they have a direct connection to your energy centres. You can find more on this topic in my blog.

What are energy centres?

There are 7 main energy centres, which are also called flames or chakras. From bottom to top starting with red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. Each individual flame/chakra is connected to the physical body and also has a strong effect on our soul life and our spiritual experience.

The flames are divided into 3 so-called cauldrons. The lower cauldron with red (root chakra), orange (sacral chakra) and yellow (solar plexus) is the cauldron of joy of life. You can feed the cauldron with everything that is good for you, what you love and, of course, with good food.

The second and middle cauldron is the cauldron of vocation and illuminates the heart chakra with the colour green. What is my calling? What am I burning for? What do I like to do? You feed this cauldron with passion and food that is connected to the heart.

The third and upper cauldron contains the chakras blue (throat chakra), indigo (forehead chakra/third eye) and violet (crown chakra). This is about the spiritual, the connection, thoughts, personal expression. You feed this cauldron with good thoughts, meditation and light, vegan food.

Pumpkin from an Ayurvedic perspective

Pumpkin has a sweet, bitter and tart flavour and contains the elements water and earth. It increases the KAPHA dosha and balances the VATA dosha. Autumn and early winter with their storms move VATA and like to bring us into imbalance. The flavours sweet, sour and salty can help to weather the storms. You can find out more about energies and doshas on my Kitchen sound page. In combination with the dates, figs and rice, this pumpkin dish gives us cosy warmth and the sweetness of life.

How did this recipe come about?

I completed my Ayurvedic cookery training with Gabriele Sitaram Sabnis, who runs Ayurveda training and courses together with Nicky Sitaram Sabnis. Nicky has written many Ayurveda cookery books together with Gabriele. This recipe is a suggestion from his cookery book: "Mindful Ayurveda Cuisine".

I always like to get ideas from cookery books, especially from Gabriele and Nicky, whose knowledge of Ayurvedic cuisine is very comprehensive. With these ideas, I go to my cookery studio and compose my own variation that is meaningful to me and my fellow diners at that moment.

Listen to your inner voice
Ayurveda is an ancient wisdom teaching and is based on many pillars. One area is dedicated to the mental/spiritual way of life and focuses primarily on listening to yourself, your inner voice and your body. Have the courage to try different variations of the recipe. Experiment with the spices and ingredients. Perhaps a little more date or more pumpkin? Listen to yourself!

Persons

3

Time

60 min

Cuisine

Ayurveda

Course

Main course

Ingredients

1 medium-sized Hokkaido pumpkin
400 ml coconut milk
8 pitted dates
8 figs
2 tsp paprika powder
4 TL Tandoori Masala
1 msp star anise powder
1 tsp Amchur
2 tbsp pumpkin seeds
2 tsp pink pepper
1 1/2 tsp black salt
1/2 cup rice
1/2 cup red or yellow lentils
1 tbsp ghee
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 black cardamom pod
2 cloves
1 tsp black cumin seeds
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp fresh kitchen herbs
1 squeeze of lemon juice

Preparation steps

Step 1

Wash the pumpkin, cut in half, remove the seeds and cut into 1.5 cm thick slices. Bring 2 litres of water to the boil in a wide pan, add 1 teaspoon of salt and simmer the pumpkin slices for approx. 5 minutes.

Step 2

Remove the pumpkin from the water, drain well and place in an ovenproof dish. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees top/bottom heat.

Step 3

Heat the coconut milk in a small pan, add the dried fruit, paprika powder, tandoori masala, star anise and amchur, bring everything to the boil briefly.

Step 4

Puree with a hand blender, add the black salt, mix well and pour the sauce over the pumpkin wedges. Sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and pink pepper. Bake in a preheated oven at 180 degrees for approx. 15 minutes.

Step 5

Rinse the lentils in a sieve with water until the water runs clear. Drain the lentils well.

Step 6

Heat the ghee in a pan, briefly fry the fennel seeds, cloves, black cumin seeds, coriander seeds and cardamom pod in the hot ghee until fragrant. Immediately add the lentils and rice and sauté for approx. 3 minutes.

Step 7

Deglaze with 2 1/2 cups of water, add the turmeric, bring to the boil, close the lid and simmer over a low heat for 20 minutes! Caution: Do not stir again!

Step 8

At the end of the cooking time, carefully fold in the salt, freshly chopped herbs and a few squeezes of lemon juice. Serve together!

Roasted potatoes with colourful vegetables and soy dip

Colourful variety on the plate. A rich meal for all the senses. A cheat sheet for food intolerances.

Tomato jalapeno ragout

For me, sweet and sour tomatoes epitomise the summer of my childhood. We always had an abundance of home-grown tomatoes. The whole garden smelled of the incomparable aroma of the tomato plant.

Apple celery soup with roasted fennel

This soup contains all the Ayurvedic flavours: sweet, sour, salty, hot, bitter and tart. Do you know which of the ingredients belongs to which flavour? Try it out and enjoy this harmonious soup.

Chapati

Chapati are an ideal accompaniment to an Ayurvedic meal or in the evening with a warming soup to reduce VATA.

rocket herb pasta

If you're in a hurry, this simple but very tasty recipe is ideal. If you have rocket and herbs growing in your own garden - bring them on!

Lemongrass soup with prawns

Wanderlust? This soup brings the warmth, aromas and flavours of Thailand to your table. It also combines the Ayurvedic principles of the 6 flavours, warming your body and soul.

Here you will find an overview of all articles

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